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There are tons of exercises, drills and products to help you keep your fitness through the winter riding months.

Fun and fitness when winter bike riding is not your thing

by John Brown

Snow, ice and cold are excellent conditions for Fat Biking, but how do you keep your fitness if fat biking isn’t your thing? Luckily, there are tons of exercises, drills, and products to help you keep you in shape through the winter months.

winter riding

Fun is fat through the winter

Off the bike fitness ideas

Even the smallest efforts help you stay fit. Trying things like taking the stairs rather than the elevator, parking on the opposite side of the lot and walking when shopping or taking time in the evening to go for walks around the neighborhood will make a big difference when the riding season comes back around. You can also start putting some time in at the gym. In the past, I had a gym membership that I would turn off except for three months a year. I enjoyed yoga classes, weight training, treadmills, spin classes, as well as all sorts of other gym related activities.

On the Bike training

Besides fat biking (which is the best winter riding option) you can enjoy your bike through the winter by buying an indoor trainer. An indoor trainer holds your bicycle upright and offers resistance when you pedal, thus turning your bike into a stationary bicycle. When using an Indoor trainer, you can ride from the comfort of your own home or in a group setting. Most bike shops have trainer nights in their stores through the winter.

winter riding

Trainer rides are a great way to connect with other riders

If you join a shop’s group trainer ride, there is usually a leader. However, riding alone can still be fun. Most people start riding their trainer while watching TV and it’s a great plan at first, but that quickly gets boring. I find it interesting to use trainer specific workouts online. There are plenty of free and for-pay versions. Additionally, depending on the trainer you buy, some of those workouts will change the resistance through your trainer.

Spin classes

Most gyms offer spin classes. These classes use a stationary bicycle, music, and instructors to guide a course through a one-hour workout. These rides are enjoyable and offer an intensity that is difficult to achieve riding alone at home.

Winter riding

Spin Class is a fast and fun workout

There are, however, a few downsides with spin classes to keep in mind. One issue is that a spin bike won’t fit the same as your bike. Many riders will install their saddle and pedals on a spin bike before each class. The other potential problem is that the courses you can select, are not tailored toward your personal goals. The levels are usually high tempo, high effort workouts that might not fit with your training plan.

Fun in the Snow

If you live in a colder weather climate and snow is the reality for months at a time you can enjoy the white stuff and keep your fitness. Cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, and ice skating are fantastic ways to get your heart rate up. I love skating on our pond with my boys because one, I’m not good at it, so I get to use new muscles and two, I have to work hard to keep up with them.

winter riding

Our winter oasis where I fumble through learning to skate

However, you find your fitness through the winter, enjoy your time off the bike. The brief time between fall and spring is perfect to strengthen new muscles, work on flexibility, and let your body recover from a full season of cycling. Additionally, time off the bike always makes me more excited to get back on it once the weather clears.

Winter fat bike season is once again upon us as the leaves fall and temps become cooler. While riding a fat bike is much like riding a regular bike, there is a certain fat bike etiquette to keep in mind when you get out there on the trail this winter season for some fun.

Fat Bike Etiquette vs. Rules of the trail as the winter season progresses

by Jess Leong  

Winter fat bike season is once again upon us as the leaves fall and temps become cooler. While riding a fat bike is much like riding a regular bike, there is a certain fat bike etiquette to keep in mind when you get out there on the trail this winter season for some fun.

Everyone on the trail wants to have a good time and make memories in the bold north’s crisp clean air. Whether that’s biking, hiking snowboarding, skiing, riding a snowmobile, or snowshoeing, these are all valid activities. At the end of the day, for everyone to have a good time, you need to share the trail. These rules below not only keep everyone free from harm, but it also keeps it comfortable and fun for everyone.

Fat Bike Etiquette – Being Polite and Respecting All Users of the Trail

Yield to all other users of the trail when riding. This includes hikers and especially skiers since they do not have brakes to stop when traveling. Be constantly aware of your surroundings for who and what is around you. Everyone is trying to enjoy the outdoors. When on your Fatty:

  1. Ride on the firmest part of the track to prevent making a deep rut in the trail. These cuts more than a few inches are difficult, if not impossible, to repair.
  2. Stay as far right as possible on the trail. This is so that skiers, snowmobiles, etc. can pass on the left.
  3. Do not ride on the Nordic trails or classic trails. These trails are specifically groomed and tires that go across or over them ruin the trails and can cause problems for those people using them. Being respectful and sharing the trail is important for the enjoyment of everyone.
  4. Respect any closures or alternative days where bikers or skiers specifically have the trail. This is also important because if the trail is closed no one will be looking out for you if you fall. Plus, other trails might be closed or have maintenance going on. This can cause problems if you’re there.
  5. Wear reflective clothing and use lights or blinkers. This helps signal to others where you are from a distance. Skiers and snowmobiles travel quickly and seeing you as far away as possible can help them change their route so there is no collision or problems that will arise.
  6. Consider donating to the shared trails to help cover the cost of maintenance. It takes people to keep the trails well groomed and ready for people to ride, ski, or hike on them. A donation can go a long way to keeping that trail ready for when you want to use it again.

If you are riding in a group, do not ride side by side. This makes it hard for anyone passing by to get through or weave around. It also can block up the trail.

Rules of the Fat Bike Trail

Many general rules of the fat bike trail are the same as mountain biking or riding on regular trails. However, there is a major difference to keep in mind in addition to the general rules of the trail.

Understand ice travel and how to do it safely. Riding in the winter means riding on top of ice and snow. Throughout the winter there will be times where it’s warmer or colder out which can affect the ground beneath your tires. Know how to deal with this. Many people also ride on top of the frozen water. Riding across a frozen lake or river can be extremely dangerous if the ice were to crack. Learn how thick the ice needs to be to carry your weight, plus your bike when venturing across frozen waters.

Always bring items with you that can help in case you’re in a situation when the ice does break from under you. International Mountain Bicycling Association recommends that ice picks and a length of rope should be taken along if riding on lakes or rivers.

Practice fat bike etiquette, follow the the rules of the trail and have fun.

Practice fat bike etiquette, follow the rules of the trail and have fun.

Fat Bike Etiquette – General Rules of the Trail

The International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) developed the “Rules of the Trail” to promote responsible and courteous conduct on shared-use trails. Keep in mind that conventions for yielding and passing may vary in different locations, or with traffic conditions. This list is also on IMBA‘s website and on our Minnesota Bike/Hike Guide.

Before You Ride

  1. Plan Ahead: Know your equipment, your ability and the area in which you are riding and prepare accordingly. Strive to be self-sufficient: keep your equipment in good repair and carry necessary supplies for changes in weather or other conditions.
  2. Let People Know: Make sure there’s at least one other person who knows where you’re headed, when and where you left from, and when you’re hoping to get back. Any things can happen on the trail and if something ever happened, it’s important that someone knows where you might be.
  3. Ride Open Trails: Respect trail and road closures — ask a land manager for clarification if you are uncertain about the status of a trail. Do not trespass on private land. Obtain permits or other authorization as required. Be aware that bicycles are not permitted in areas protected as state or federal Wilderness. This mean, you guessed it, check ahead of time!

While Riding

  1. Leave No Trace: Be sensitive to the dirt beneath you. Wet and muddy trails are more vulnerable to damage than dry ones. When the trail is soft, consider other riding options. This also means staying on existing trails and not creating new ones. Don’t cut switchbacks. Be sure to pack out at least as much as you pack in.
  2. Control Your Bicycle: Inattention for even a moment could put yourself and others at risk. Obey all bicycle speed regulations and recommendations, and ride within your limits.
  3. Yield Appropriately: Do your utmost to let your fellow trail users know you’re coming — a friendly greeting or bell ring are good methods. Try to anticipate other trail users as you ride around corners. Bicyclists should yield to other non-motorized trail users unless the trail is clearly signed for bike-only travel. Bicyclists traveling downhill should yield to ones headed uphill unless the trail is clearly signed for one-way or downhill-only traffic. In general, strive to make each pass a safe and courteous one.
  4. Never Scare Animals: Animals are easily startled by an unannounced approach, a sudden movement or a loud noise. Give animals enough room and time to adjust to you. When passing horses, use special care and follow directions from the horseback riders (ask if uncertain). Running cattle and disturbing wildlife are serious offenses.
Riding a trail system before it snows is advisable when possible.

Riding a trail system before it snows is advisable when possible.

Don’t Forget!

Also, always wear a helmet and appropriate safety gear.

Search here for an IMBA Club to join and don’t forget to HaveFun!

 

Jess Leong is a freelance writer for HaveFunBiking.com.

The Strider Snow Cup has been dubbed the “Toddler Tour de France,” and will be held at Buck Hill, in Burnsville, MN on March 2nd.

More kids on bikes with the 2019 Strider Snow Cup at Buck Hill

by Leslie Prevish

The Strider Snow Cup has been dubbed the “Toddler Tour de France” by the Wall Street Journal, ESPN and others. A world leader in teaching young children to ride and rip on two wheels, Strider Bike has announced Buck Hill, in Burnsville, Minnesota, will host the Snow Cup on March 2nd. Toddlers ages five and under will shred the bunny slopes on their Strider 12 Bikes outfitted with the Strider Snow Ski accessory for a day of snow-filled fun. This family-friendly Snow Cup program is an extension to Striders events, offering a much different climate for two-wheeling toddlers to ride in.

Toddler Powder Takeover Set for 2019 Strider Snow Cup

After numerous successful Strider Snow Cup events held across the globe, including Russia, Japan, and the United Kingdom. This event at Buck Hill marks the first Strider Snow Cup in the United States since 2013.

Using Strider’s accessories the Strider 12 Balance Bike can be converted for use in the snow. This makes riding year-round fun and in any climate a reality.

Snow Cup attendees can expect an atmosphere of fun and encouragement. As toddlers put their Strider skills to the test, the atmosphere will make for unforgettable video and photos.

Pre-registration for the Strider Snow Cup is required. Each child that registers receives a Strider Snow Cup bib, Strider goodie bag valued at over $50, and a single-day use lift ticket to Buck Hill for their parent or guardian ($45 value). Registration is $36 and now open at www.StriderBikes.com/BuckHill.

The Strider Snow Cup Series

This will be the first Strider Cup Race of 2019 in the United States, find more races scheduled below, as the snow melts:

  • May 4, 2019: LA Live, Los Angeles
  • June 15, 2019: Boulder Civic Area (Central Park), Boulder, Colorado
  • July 6, 2019: The Commons, Minneapolis
  • October 4-5, 2019: NASCAR Hall of Fame, Charlotte, North Carolina (Strider Cup World Championship).

 No qualification is necessary to participate in a Strider Cup or Strider Cup World Championship event. Registration for the May – October 2019 races will be available January 2019 at www.StriderBikes.com. Dates and locations subject to change.

About Strider Sports International, Inc.

Strider creates and inspires future generations of riders by giving children as young as six months old the best first-bike experience. Strider Bikes revolutionized the bike’s design to develop a child’s balance first and pairs each balance bike with a proven learn-to-ride process. Children across the globe are starting out on a Strider Bike and becoming two-wheeling virtuosos – before they’re out of diapers.

Founded in 2007, in Rapid City, South Dakota, Strider has sold more than 2 million bikes and is distributed in more than 75 countries. Visit www.StriderBikes.comFacebook or Instagram.

No matter how brave you are sometimes weather conditions keep you from conquering those trails. Luckily, there are plenty of ways to have fun with indoor biking.

Indoor biking is fun and effective training through the winter

by John Brown, HaveFunBiking.com

No matter how brave you are sometimes weather conditions keep you from conquering those trails. This is especially true as the mercury drops and turns our beloved Earth into something reminiscent of the Russian front. Luckily, there are plenty of ways to have fun with indoor biking.

Indoor Biking with a Spin Class

Most gyms offer spin classes. These classes use a stationary bicycle, music, and instructors to guide a class through about a 1 hour workout. Spin classes are a source of indoor biking, and it gets you out of the house.

There are, however, a few downsides with spin classes to keep in mind. One issue is that a spin bike won’t fit the same as your own bike. To fix this, many riders will install their own saddle and pedals on a spin bike before each class. The other potential problem is that the classes are not tailored toward your personal goals. The classes are usually high tempo, high effort workouts that might not fit with your training plan. Some riders find they like the community of spin class but not the specific ride, so they opt in or out of certain portions of the wworkout.

Riding your bike indoors spin class

Indoor biking with a spin class

Using an Indoor Trainer

Riding an indoor trainer has gotten much more popular for riders of all ability levels, and it’s the kind of indoor biking where you can use your own bike. A trainer is a device that holds your bicycle upright, creates resistance when pedaling, and simulates an outdoor ride while riding your bike indoors. Using an Indoor trainer, you can ride from the comfort of your own home, or in a group setting (most bike shops have trainer nights through the winter).

Riding you bike indoors trainer class

Indoor Trainer Group Ride

There is usually a leader when riding with a group, but if riding alone, you can still have fun. It’s best to start with a plan. If you intend to just get on the trainer and ride for 60 minutes while watching TV, I hate to break it to you, but that quickly gets boring. So how do you keep the ride fun? First, you cannot rely on terrain to supply stimulus so you must create your own intrigue. There are no hills, descents, turns, or beautiful vistas to keep you interested. But you can use your trainer to mimic the efforts of a great outdoor ride.

How to Build a Ride

As an example, let’s describe a normal outdoor ride, then create a workout to mimic that ride on the trainer. The ride starts by carving through a neighborhood on our way to open roads. Snaking through our neighborhood would require some turning, braking and acceleration (a great natural warm up), so on the trainer you would do something like:

  • Pedal in an easy gear for one minute
  • Then for the two subsequent minutes, increase your pedaling speed (called Cadence)
  • Follow that by slowing that cadence down over the next two minutes.
  • Repeating that two or three times is a great way to get your legs moving

The next obstacle on our imaginary ride is a hilly section of road. To mimic hilly terrain when riding your bike indoors, try the following:

  • Shift into a harder gear and pedal at 80% of your maximum effort for 2 or three minutes
  • Followed that by one or two minutes of soft pedaling (hard effort for the climb, followed by no effort on the descent).
  • Repeat this type of interval in groups of three.

Finally, our ride concludes with a series of city line sprints (earn those bragging rights over your friends). To simulate this action, try the following:

  • Shift your bicycle into a difficult gear
  • Ride at 80% effort for one minute
  • Then sprint all out (max effort) for fifteen to twenty seconds.
  • Follow each effort with some soft pedaling.

Workout Example

A written cue sheet of this ride would look like the following:

5Min warm up

1Min 50% effort low cadence                                                                                                                       1Min 50% effort medium cadence                                                                                                           1Min 50% effort High cadence                                                                                                                 1Min 50% effort Medium cadence                                                                                                               1Min 50% effort low cadence                                                                                                                                     Repeat 3x

4Min soft pedal

3Min 80% effort                                                                                                                                             2Min soft pedal                                                                                                                                                          Repeat 3x                          

4Min soft pedal

1Min 80 effort                                                                                                                                               15Second sprint                                                                                                                                             45Second soft pedal                                                                                                                                                  Repeat 4x                           

9 min Cool down with drills

A ride like the one above takes one hour, keeps you moving, and only involves hard effort for ¼ of the ride. By switching up different intervals of effort and rest, indoor biking can be beneficial and very fun.

Trainer Pitfalls

Time on the trainer can be very beneficial to your riding, but it can also be very hard on you if done improperly. When riding outdoor, you have natural portions of rest while coasting or descending, but on an indoor trainer you cannot coast. People tend to pedal at effort on a trainer throughout the entire ride and overdo it. A good rule of thumb is to balance high effort with rest at a three to one ratio. If a ride calls for 10 total minutes at 80% effort, be sure to include 30 total minutes of low effort work.

riding your bike indoors tired

Too Tired!

Low Effort, High Benefit Drills

How do you keep the ride interesting without effort? Try including drills like one leg drills, high cadence drills, spin up drills, top only drills, and toe touch drills. These require very little effort but build new skills.

bike indoors

One leg Drill

  • One leg drills – Like they sound, these drills are done with one leg (see above). Clip your right leg out of your pedal, hang it away from the bike, and pedal with only your left leg. Try to get the pedal stroke to be as smooth as possible, without any noise or bumps.
  • Spin-up drill – With your bike in an easy gear, try to spin the pedals as quickly as possible. Keep increasing your cadence until your upper body begins to bounce, then taper back to a normal speed. Repeat, each time trying to get faster while keeping your upper body still (this whole drill takes about 30 seconds per spin-up).
  • High-cadence drill – With your bike in an easy gear, spin at the fastest cadence you can without your upper body bouncing. Hold that cadence for one or two minutes.
  • Top only drills – Try to pedal using light effort and attempt to keep the top of your foot in contact with the top of your shoe throughout the pedal rotation. You won’t actually be pressing down on the pedal during this drill, but instead pulling up.
  • Toe touch drills – While pedaling, attempt to touch your toe to the front of your shoe at the top of each pedal stroke. While this isn’t possible, it will help teach your body to begin the pedal stroke earlier in its rotation.

With a little research and a little experimentation, indoor biking can keep you satisfied while you wait for the weather to get better.

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This special day began last year and on December 1st, is a way to bring special attention to local bike shops when the cycling season has slowed down. Like other brick and mortar retail establishments, shops are seeing less and less foot traffic especially this time of the year.

Get to know the people who service your bicycle on Bike Shop Day

So what is Bike Shop Day, and what inspired it you ask?

This special day began last year on December 9th as a way to bring special attention to local bike shops when the cycling season has slowed down. Like other brick and mortar retail establishments, bike shops are seeing less and less foot traffic especially this time of the year. Looking for ways to get people into their shop, 718 Cyclery, in Brooklyn, NY, created Bike Shop Day as an open-source event to get people into bicycle oriented stores during a slow period before the holidays.

Bike Shop Day is a special day to bring special attention to local bike shops when the cycling season has slowed down.

Bike Shop Day is a special day to bring special attention to local bike shops when the cycling season has slowed down.

Taking the idea from the record industry and their national Record Store Day, 718 Cycle took the ideas, with many other bicycle stores around the country joined in. Like many other shops, across the U.S. in 2017, stores invited people in for an event with sales, demos, food and a party. The rest is history and with the success last year the date has changed to the first Saturday in December, this year.

Why you should visit your Bike Shop on December 1st

Some of the benefits of attending this special day, shops offer free classes on maintaining your bike, to tours around the neighborhood, etc. It is also a good time to visit and get to know the shop mechanic, so you know them on a first name basis for future reference. Plus, there are some special prizes for stopping in and saying hi. Plus, you might find that perfect Christmas gift.

Bike Shop Day serves to connect the independent bike shop with the community as a beacon of inclusiveness, a healthy lifestyle and sustainable local business practices. Like the 718 Cyclery, check out your favorite bike shop in your area to see what they are planning for December 1st.

For Bike Shops

For this year’s event, on December 1, 2018,  718 Cyclery is asking all participating shops and vendors to submit a proposal for an event that serves to welcome people who are underrepresented in the cycling industry. Go to there website at http://bikeshopday.com/

 

Cycling League JV2 Girls | Izzy Rasmusen #551, Alexandria Area | Mt. Kato 2018

MN HS Cycling League celebrates its sixth year with many honors

by Libby Hurley, MN High School Cycling League

Over 2,500+ people attended the MN High School Cycling Leagues annual Year-End Ceremony at Northrup Auditorium, on. Fri. Nov. 9, to celebrate and reflect on an amazing and historic season. Since 2012, when the MN League launched, each year, strategic changes or additions have been made to move the MN League forward to getting #morekidsonbikes.

Cycling League medals and trophies for 2018 | Northrup Auditorium | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

Cycling League medals and trophies for 2018 | Northrup Auditorium | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

Over the years, they have added races to the schedule, included middle school aged riders to the program, introduced a bye-week schedule and moved to ability-based racing. For 2018, they piloted the Giant Bicycles Dirt School Spring Riding Program, created divisions in middle school, added the Framed Bike Skills Challenge event and added an additional race date and bye-week to the schedule. As the MN League grows in size, schedule and program changes are done to accommodate and accelerate this growth.

In 2018, ending the season in Mankato with almost 1,600 riders, the MN Cycling League became the second largest mountain bike league in the nation. With over 25 NICA leagues across the nation, MN is part of a growing movement with the National Interscholastic Cycling Association (NICA).

The MN League has become more than a racing program, it has become a youth development program. Each year the MN League adds hundreds of new student-athletes, coaches, volunteers, and spectators. Who’s ready for 2019?

Cycling League highlights and overall season results

Jaden Neimeyer, Hutchinson | One of the 2018 Student Athlete Speakers | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

Jaden Neimeyer, Hutchinson | One of the 2018 Student-Athlete Speakers | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

To celebrate the accomplishments of all, each year, four students are selected to offer their thoughts and thanks to coaches, volunteers, parents, and their fellow teammates. This year, Jaden Neimeyer, from Hutchinson offered his thoughts on volunteers, Olivia Fox from Wayzata expounded on the impact of the coaches, Grant Hietpas from Stillwater thanked all of the parents, and Vladimir Lind from Burnsville shared his positive reactions from being part of the MN mountain bike community.

As the crowd clapped and cheered for these four amazing students, the lights dimmed in preparation for the season-ending video from Todd Bauer at tmbimages.com.

Watch Video on Vimeo

New race locations and program changes for 2019

Josh Kleve, Executive Director for the MN Cycling League | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

Josh Kleve, Executive Director for the MN Cycling League | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

The 2019 race schedule of the MN Cycling League was well received by the entire audience. As the dates and locations were announced, cheers erupted from the crowd.

The new race location, just south of Hayward, WI, brought on the largest reaction. In 2019, the MN League will hold their own race during the Fat Tire Festival Weekend. More details on this race are coming, but it will be separate from the Short and Fat race.

2019 Race Dates and Locations

* Aug. 24/25 – Schindler’s Way Trail, Austin, MN
* Sept. 7/8 – Lake Rebecca, Rockford, MN
* Sept. 14/15 – Chequamegon Fat Tire Festival, near Hayward, WI
* Sept. 28/29 – Whitetail Ridge, River Falls, WI
* Oct. 5/6 – Detroit Mountain, Detroit Lakes, MN
* Oct. 12/13 – Spirit Mt., Duluth, MN
* Oct. 26/27 – Mt. Kato, Mankato, MN

6th-graders added to the middle school program

Exciting changes to the program include the addition of 6th-grade riders to the middle school program and instead of having one day of racing, the MN League is moving to a two-day race weekend which will allow a pre-ride of the course on both Saturday and Sunday. Middle school races will be held on Saturdays and High school races will be held on Sundays.

Watch for more details on these exciting changes.

Special acknowledgment – Coach/Asst. Coach of the Year, Volunteer of the Year, Racers with Heart and the Jeff Robertson Award

Mike Busch, Mankato - Coach of the Year | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

Mike Busch, Mankato – Coach of the Year | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

The MN League respects their student-athletes and acknowledges their efforts to achieve a podium spot, however, the MN League takes this evening to celebrate a number of people who might not achieve a podium spot and their actions have set examples for others through their courage, determination, leadership or sportsmanship.

“I always look forward to this event,” said Josh Kleve, Executive Director of the MN League. “This is the last opportunity of the year for our community to come together, share stories, give thanks and pay respects to a few key people whose contributions are significant to the success of our league. This is their time on the podium.”

▪ Coach of the Year: Mike Busch, Mankato
▪ Asst. Coach of the Year: Ryan Erspamer, Duluth
▪ Volunteer of the Year: Eric Larson, Duluth
▪ Male Racer with Heart – Ian Hase, White Bear Lake
▪ Female Racer with Heart – Zoey Sheedy, Rochester
▪ Jeff Robertson Award – Todd Bauer, MN League Core Staff

OVERALL SEASON RESULTS

Congratulations to all! | Northrup Auditorium 2018

Congratulations to all! | Northrup Auditorium 2018

INDIVIDUAL RESULTS

Congratulations to all on a successful season!

Final overall individual results are now posted to the website.
Full Individual results for Varsity, JV2, JV3, Freshman and Middle School.
View Full Results

TEAM RESULTS

High School D1 Team Results:
1. Stillwater
2. Edina
3. Southwest Mpls

High School D2 Team Results:
1. Crosby-Ironton
2. Highland Park
3. Chaska

Middle School D1 Team Results:
1. Stillwater
2. Prior Lake
3. Washburn

Middle School D2 Team Results:
1. Rochester Composite
2. Alexandria Area
3. New Prague

Final overall team results are now posted to the website.
Full Team results for D1 and D2.
View Full Results

EVENT AND RACE PHOTOS
View Photos. Photo Credit: Todd Bauer and David Markman – MN League Official Photographers.

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

Please take a minute to review our list of local and national sponsors. With their support, we are able to offer our youth development programs. When considering a purchase, be sure to visit and thank our sponsors for their support. Please encourage them to continue supporting the MN League and our student-athletes.

VIEW ALL MN LEAGUE AND NATIONAL NICA SPONSORS

minnesota-email-footer-2018

Its Global Fat-Bike Day, December 1

Its Global Fat-Bike Day, with multiple locations, Dec 1st

Global Fat-Bike Day, Multiple Locations, Dec 1

A worldwide grassroots campaign that started six years ago to bring people from the fat-bike community together to ride and make new friends. In honor of Global Fat-Bike Day here is a list of several rides that are scheduled in Iowa, Minnesota and close to the border in Wisconsin that you may want to check out:

Downtown Bicycles Global Fat-Bike Day, Northfield, MN

Levis Mound Trail Global Fat-Bike DayNeillsville, WI

Nicollet Bike Shop Global Fat-Bike Day, Mankato, MN

Penn Cycle Global Fat-Bike Day, Eagan, MN

Tonka Cycle & Ski Global Fat-Bike Day, Hopkins, MN

Trailhead Cycle Global Fat-Bike Day, Champlin, MN

Tour Right Bike Global Fat-Bike Day, Little Falls, MN

Spokengear Global Fat-Bike DayTwo Harbors, MN

Wolly Bike Club Global Fat-Bike Day, Saint Croix Falls, WI

 See more on Global Fat Bike Day here!

With the days a bit colder and daylight is getting shorter for a few more weeks, there are still many more fun bike events scheduled into December.  Global Fat Bike Day, on December 1st.  With cooler temps drifting south there are still some enjoyable days to ride if you dress in layers.

See more fun fall bike events leading up to Global Fat Bike Day, Dec 1

A worldwide grassroots campaign that started six years ago to bring people from the fat-bike community together to ride and make new friends. In honor of Global Fat-Bike Day here is a list of several rides that are scheduled in Iowa, Minnesota and close to the border in Wisconsin that you may want to check out:

More bike events ahead

Full Moon High Trestle Bridge Ride Slater IA  Nov 24 

Pie Burner Fat Bike Ride Hibbing MN  Nov 24

Bikes with low tire pressure offer more stability on slippery roads. Adding studs to the bikes tires adds more control.

With cooler temps drifting south there are still some enjoyable days to ride if you dress in layers.

Global Fat-Bike Day, Multiple Locations, Dec 1

A worldwide grassroots campaign that started six years ago to bring people from the fat bike community together to ride and make new friends. In honor of Global Fat-Bike Day here is a list of several rides that are scheduled in Iowa, Minnesota and close to the border in Wisconsin that you may want to check out:

Downtown Bicycles Global Fat-Bike Day, Northfield, MN

Levis Mound Trail Global Fat-Bike DayNeillsville, WI

Nicollet Bike Shop Global Fat-Bike Day, Mankato, MN

Penn Cycle Global Fat-Bike Day, Eagan, MN

Tonka Cycle & Ski Global Fat-Bike Day, Hopkins, MN

Trailhead Cycle Global Fat-Bike Day, Champlin, MN

Tour Right Bike Global Fat-Bike Day, Little Falls, MN

Spokengear Global Fat-Bike DayTwo Harbors, MN

Wolly Bike Club Global Fat-Bike Day, Saint Croix Falls, WI

 See more at Global Fat Bike Day here!

Pie Burner Fat Bike Ride Hibbing MN  Nov 24

Did we miss an event?   Please submit the event or pass this link to the director for our Calendar Listing at HaveFunBiking, so it’s in the next e-Mag – thanks!

See more bike fun!

See more events further out in both the Iowa and Minnesota Bike/Hike Guides.

So bookmark HaveFunBiking.com and find your next adventure. As you explore all the bike-friendly destinations we have covered, please share your experience with us. And, don’t forget to smile we may be around the next corner with our camera ready to capture you for our next pic of the day!

MN HS Cycling League JV2 Girls | Izzy Rasmusen #551, Alexandria Area | Mt. Kato 2018 | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

Highlights to the MN HS Cycling League championship race in Mankato

by Libby Hurley, MN HS Cycling League /Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

For the fourth consecutive year, the MN High School Cycling League headed back to Mt. Kato, for Race #7. This State championship race was held in Mankato, MN on Saturday, October 27 and Sunday, October 28, 2018. A favorite course for many young racers, the location, and venue easily accommodated the 3,500+ racers and spectators that attended the event.

Freshman Boys D1 | Wyatt Peterson, Burnsville | Mt. Kato 2018 | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

Freshman Boys D1 | Wyatt Peterson, Burnsville | Mt. Kato 2018 | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

MN HS Cycling League highlights

For two days, over 1,200 racers from 64 teams across the state of Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota. South Dakota and Western Wisconsin came together to compete in the final MN HS Cycling League race of the 2018 season.

Since there was a bye-week schedule in place for the season, each of the six previous races had a reduced number of teams competing, resulting in less impact to the event venues and students were able to compete against different racers. But, at this race event, all of the MN League teams were able to compete in one race; resulting in the largest MN League race to date.

Freshman Girls | Victoria Voss, Rochester | Mt. Kato 2018 | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

Freshman Girls | Victoria Voss, Rochester | Mt. Kato 2018 | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

As the team tents went up on Friday evening, the race course and community came together. People were laughing, dogs were barking, cheers of encouragement were heard along with excited voices shouting out greetings – the MN League race venue had arrived in Mankato for two days of action-packed mountain bike racing and not a speck of snow in the forecast.

This year, the weather cooperated, two days of brisk, bright days made for an amazing race weekend. Against a backdrop of brilliant fall colors, racers wound their way up the mountain, and then into the wooded singletrack, to complete a lap in the just under 4-mile course. Based on a rider’s skill level, the number of laps increases, with varsity riders completing four laps or 16-miles.

As the last race of the season, and for many seniors, the last race of their high school careers, the finish line was filled with cheering spectators and close finishes, but there were also tears and hugs, as competitors shook hands one last time.

Thank you to the folks at Mt. Kato for their support before and during the race. And, thanks to the team members and volunteers from the Mankato Composite team for their gracious hosting of our core staff dinner on Friday night and their volunteer efforts before and during the race.

Get ready Minnesota – racing will be back soon. Watch for news regarding the 2019 racing schedule, later this month.

JV2 Girls | Izzy Rasmusen #551, Alexandria Area | Mt. Kato 2018

JV2 Girls | Izzy Rasmusen #551, Alexandria Area | Mt. Kato 2018

MN HS Cycling League race #7 – Results and more photos

FULL RACE RESULTS
View Full Results

RACE DAY PHOTOS
View Race Photos. Photo Credit: Todd Bauer and David Markman – MN League Official Photographers.

LOCAL NEWS COVERAGE
Kristine Goodrich, covered the event for Mankato Free Press. View News Story

KEYC, a local Mankato television station covered the event. View News Story

HALLOWEEN FUN

Since it was Halloween weekend; amidst the cheering fans, there were a few interesting characters: a life-size banana, an elephant, Yeti, a giraffe and even a zebra! Tutus were out, tiaras were on helmets and there was even a racer that went by in a full bear costume.

RACE RESULTS

Freshman Boys D2 | Owen Skroch, St. Croix Composite | Mt. Kato 2018 | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

Freshman Boys D2 | Owen Skroch, St. Croix Composite | Mt. Kato 2018 | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

In the Middle School D1 race, Stillwater and Prior Lake almost tied for first place, with a difference of three points. Stillwater secured the first place over Prior Lake and Washburn took home the third place trophy.

In the D2 Middle School Team competition, Rochester decisively took the first place trophy over Alexandria Area with Mankato taking third place.

Varsity Riders from SW Mpls, Hopkins and Stillwater at the finish line | Mt. Kato 2018 | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

Varsity Riders from SW Mpls, Hopkins and Stillwater at the finish line | Mt. Kato 2018 | Photo Credit: tmbimages.com

In the High School Team Competition, Division 1: Stillwater with podium wins in over 5 categories, took home the first place trophy, with Edina High School securing second place. Southwest Mpls was close behind to take third place. Division 2: Crosby-Ironton High School beat out Highland Park for the first place trophy. Chaska took the 3rd place trophy.

Season overall winners will be announced at the Year End Ceremony on Fri. Nov. 9 at Northrup Auditorium in Minneapolis, MN. Details

About the Minnesota High School Cycling League 

The Minnesota High School Cycling League is a state-wide independent activity provider for student-athletes in 7th to 12th grade. Our mission is to build strong bodies, strong minds, and strong character through cycling, regardless of ability level. Each MN League season includes summer programs, a seven-race series, wilderness first aid certification courses and a Spring Leaders’ Summit for training and certification of coaches. The MN League exists by virtue of a range of fundraising activities, as well as generous donors, and MN League and NICA national sponsors. For more information on the MN League, visit minnesotamtb.org.

Many more fun bike events are out there to extend your fall season off riding.

See more fun fall bike events leading up to Global Fat Bike Day, Dec 1

With the days getting a bit shorter, now that daylight savings have ended, there are still many more fun bike events scheduled up through Global Fat Bike Day, on December 1st.  With cooler temps drifting south there are still some enjoyable days to ride if you dress in layers.

A bike pic to remember! This perfect fall weather day we caught this young biker dude out riding with his mom on one of the communities recreational trails in Mankato. 

A bike pic to remember! This perfect fall weather day we caught this young biker dude out riding with his mom on one of the communities recreational trails in Mankato.

Fall bike events ahead

Creekside ReUnion Cross  Coralville IA  Nov 3-4 

Winter Bike Expo  Eden Prairie, MN  Nov 3-4

Dirty Duathlon Des Moines IA Nov 10

Frosty Cross LeMars IA  Nov 10-11

Midwest Mountaineering Expo Minneapolis MN  Nov 16-18

Make-A-Wish Iowa Altoona IA Nov 17

Valley Cross West Des Moines IA Oct 17

Full Moon High Trestle Bridge Ride Slater IA  Nov 24 

Pie Burner Fat Bike Ride Hibbing MN  Nov 24

As the far north section of Minnesota gets its first measurable snowfall. In this bike pic, here in Bloomington MN, the roads are still a little wet, but doable for wheelie Wednesday.

On December 1st, its anybody’s guess wheather we see measurable snowfall or wet sloppy conditions?

Global Fat-Bike Day, Multiple Locations, Dec 1

A worldwide grassroots campaign that started six years ago to bring people from the fat bike community together to ride and make new friends. In honor of Global Fat-Bike Day here is a list of several rides that are scheduled in Iowa, Minnesota and close to the border in Wisconsin that you may want to check out:

Downtown Bicycles Global Fat-Bike Day, Northfield, MN

Levis Mound Trail Global Fat-Bike DayNeillsville, WI

Nicollet Bike Shop Global Fat-Bike Day, Mankato, MN

Penn Cycle Global Fat-Bike Day, Eagan, MN

Tonka Cycle & Ski Global Fat-Bike Day, Hopkins, MN

Trailhead Cycle Global Fat-Bike Day, Champlin, MN

Tour Right Bike Global Fat-Bike Day, Little Falls, MN

Spokengear Global Fat-Bike DayTwo Harbors, MN

Wolly Bike Club Global Fat-Bike Day, Saint Croix Falls, WI

 See more at Global Fat Bike Day here!

Did we miss an event?   Please submit the event or pass this link to the director for our Calendar Listing at HaveFunBiking, so it’s in the next e-Mag – thanks!

See more bike fun!

See more events further out in both the Iowa and Minnesota Bike/Hike Guides.

So bookmark HaveFunBiking.com and find your next adventure. As you explore all the bike-friendly destinations we have covered, please share your experience with us. And, don’t forget to smile we may be around the next corner with our camera ready to capture you for our next pic of the day!