Category Archives: News

The perfect gift for those with cold feet – GooseFeet Down Socks

The perfect solution when cold feet are an issue after fat biking, ice fishing or while sleeping. GooseFeet Gear Down Socks is a perfect solution. They also make great backcountry hut or ice house footwear with the Over-Bootie. By themselves the elastic ankle cuffs at the top of the sock ensure they stay put and keeps the warmth in. And the socks conveniently pack into a small stuff sack (included).

Choose from two lightweight materials for your Down Sock order

Two sock materials to choose from.

Choose fabric material along with several colors. Then they are filled with 850+ power premium goose down treated with DownTek for water-resistance.

10D Fabric – This new material has an amazing next-to-skin feel and is ultra-lightweight, but still has a DWR treatment and is 100% down-proof!  Colors available include Navy Blue, Forest Green, Black, Lime Green, Purple, and Brick Red.

20D Fabric – Is nylon and the most durable fabric they offer. It has a DWR treatment applied to the outside surface, so it will resist a small amount of water before allowing it to get the Down inside wet. Current colors available include Red, Aqua Blue, Magenta, Denim Grey, Hunter Green, and Black.

Socks are designed to keep your feet warm all night long

If you’d like to wear your Downsocks around camp or during midnight calls of nature, add a pair of waterproof Over-Booties to your order. They are specifically designed to fit over and protect your Down Socks during outdoor use. When purchased together, they make the perfect ultralight sock/camp shoe combo.

Order a pair from GooseFeet today!

This bike pic Saturday, enjoy your time out riding the trails with family and friends as the fall colors are at there peak.

A healthy energy boost makes any off-road cycling adventure better

by Russ Lowthian, HaveFunBiking.com

If you are like me, I like to carry a few energy boost jell packs while enjoying nature in the wild. On my latest adventure, before the snow covered the Northwoods landscape, I found Trail Butter. Trying them I found they were delicious and provided a level of energy that lasted longer. Plus, having several flavors added to the experience and fun of mountain biking in the true north.

Trail Butter flavors in the 1.15 oz. packets for an energy boost.

A natural energy boost source while off-road biking in the true north

Wanting to get one more bike adventure in before snowfall in the upper Midwest, I spent four days exploring the Beltrami Island State Forest, near Roseau, MN. A mammoth forest covering more than 700,000 acres it’s about 30 miles south of the Canadian border. With Roseau several miles away I wanted to maximize my time and the weight of what I carried along. Using a couple of primitive campsites along the 140-miles of logging roads and trail loops the Trail Butter packets fit my needs well. Each day,

The 4.5oz size was my choice on my recent Northwoods trip.

I averaged about 30-miles of mountain biking from the established base camp for that section of the State Forest. Every five or six miles I stopped and enjoyed a single-size serving size of the Trail Butter. Stopping periodically for an energy boost of this nut butter made it easy to complete the planned route in plenty of time before dark.

With Trail Butter no gooey aftertaste

As I have found with some of the other energy products on the market, with Nut Butter there was no pasty after taste. I also found the company’s claim on its website description, as “slow-burning” and this was also true. The almond component of the nut butter mix offers a ready source of fat that burns slowly, perfect for any outdoor activity. Not like some of the other energy products I have tried, full of high fructose corn syrup or other sugar that doesn’t sustain you for very long.

Offered in four flavors and three different sizes

A 16oz jar of Trail Butter works well back to base camp or at home.

The Trail Butter packaging comes in three different styles and to date come in four flavors, with their Spiced Chai Seasonal Nut Butter Blend. Their regular flavors include the Original Nut Butter Blend; Maple & Sea Salt Blend; and the Dark Chocolate & Coffee Nut Butter Blend. Like the Original flavor, which is an almond nut base with chocolate and cranberries, you will find 680 calories to turn into energy in every single serving. Sizes include:

  • The single-serving 1.15oz packets that are easy to open and resemble the packaging of a typical gel. This size works well when disposing of the packaging isn’t an issue.
  • The 4.5oz size was my choice on my recent trip. It gave me several servings in one reseal-able, easy to eat out of the pouch. I just had to decide which flavor I wanted to carry each day.
  • Also available in 16oz jars. This size works well for those who are able to make it back to base camp or at home to prepare a sandwich.

Made in the U.S., Trail Butter is manufactured by a small company out of Portland, OR.  and sells for a reasonable price. So check out their website and give Trail Butter a try for your next adventure!

A perfect pair of sandals can add to your bicycle touring adventures

by Russ Lowthian, HaveFunBiking.com

If you are like me when cycling in a new area, it is fun to get off the bike and walk around a historical area, along the beach or venture into a shopping area, especially with sandals. Many times these extra-curricular stops can lead to more treasured memories.

Telic Energy Flip Flop is a comfortable sandal for both men and women.

The only problem, hiking around in bike shoes isn’t always the best for walking. And, even if your bike shoes are fairly comfortable for walking you don’t want to get them wet or dirty, especially if you use them in conjunction with clip-on pedals. So having a second set of footwear, a pair of comfortable Telic sandals along,  can add to your comfort and fun.

Easy to carry when biking

A bungee or carabiner is the perfect way to hang Telic sandals from the seat post.

Lightweight it is easy to bungee the Telic sandals to your bikes frame or seat post if you don’t have a bike rack or large enough handlebar bag. I found that a carabiner (rock climbing gear clip) also works well. Hook the clip into the straps of the sandal and the bottom of the bike seat.

Telic sandals make the perfect footwear when bike touring

From the energy Flip-Flops to the Z-strap or the women’s Mallory it’s easy to carry along a quick change of comfortable sandals.

Telic Women’s Mallory Sandal offers a comfort slide with Orthotic Grade Arch Support

They look good and feel great with enough medial arch support to keep you floating when not pedaling. With the ergonomic technology the Telic’s heat-sensitive Novalon material molds to the shape of your foot, eliminating pressure points making each step is pretty cushy.

For more information or to order a pair check out their website today!

Think of your next adventure with a pair of comfortable Telic sandals – Happy feet!

WingLights is an inexpensive blinker light system for bicycles to display a very visible directional turn signal at an intersections.

Making a bicycling experience safer with a handlebar blinker light system

Here at HaveFunBiking, we have shared blinker systems embedded in bicycle helmets, rear-mounted signaling lights and now for those who have flat handlebars, the WingLights. This inexpensive directional light system (a perfect stocking stuffer) easy to mount into each end of the handlebars. Then, when making your turn, simply tap the light at the end of the right or left handle grip and move to the proper lane. Just like signaling when driving a car. As a cyclist riding on the road or trail you will find added comfort and visibility in displaying your intention when changing lanes or direction.

Just tap the right blinker before gesturing with a right hand signal.

Just tap the right blinker before gesturing with a right-hand signal.

Just tap the left blinker before gesturing with your left hand signal.

Just tap the left blinker before gesturing with your left-hand signal.

The WingLight directional blinkers work well on rough roads where cyclists need to have both hands on the handlebars. Just a firm tap on the surface of the selected light and it begins to blink. Then in 45 seconds, which in most cases is long enough to make the turn, the light turns off to save on your battery.

Winglights currently available in two options

The WingLights Mag, their original, is a high-quality turn signal system that magnetically attaches to your handlebar ends. It is easy to install and use. These turn signals flash bright amber and can be seen from all angles. When removed, the units clip together onto a keyring for safekeeping. The Mag is compatible with all handlebars with an inner diameter from 14.7mm to 23mm. They retail for $49.99 and batteries are included.

The WingLights Fixed v3 is a brand new, non-magnetic turn signal, built to the same high specification as the original system. Like the Mag, the Fixed v3 is permanently attached to your handlebar. The Fixed v3 sells for $34.99, on Amazon.

For more information and other products visit the manufacturer at www.cycl.bike

Brighter and safer blinkers

The blinkers help to improve cyclists’ visibility in dangerous areas, in and around intersections.

Using hand signals along with WingLights

At HaveFunBiking.com, we highly recommend the continued practice of using hand signals. This turning light system, like others on the market, offers added visibility to show your intentions when changing directions. However, they should not replace the practice of using hand signals. By continuing to gesture your movement with hand signals, along with blinkers, you multiply your chances of being seen and staying safe.

Installing the WingLights blinkers

With this review, we found installation quick and easy, taking under ten minutes. At the end of each handlebar grip, cut a sharp knife so the handlebar tube is exposed. Insert the rubber plunger of the Winglight firmly into the handlebar and tighten. You will find full instruction included in the package or for a comprehensive guide on this blinker system check out the instructional video here. 

Sorry, these blinker lights are not suitable for all handlebar types

The current WingLights are only available for straight (sometimes referred to as flat) handlebars. Curved handlebars with maximum curvature of 30° also work. The company is working on a design compatible with drop bars (also known as bullhorn and/or cruise bars) for the future.

 

The perfect wearable and convenient bike lock, the Hiplok Spin

Russ Lowthian, HaveFunBiking.com

Testing out the new Hiplok Spin, trail riding and running errands the lock offered me hassle-free convenience in keeping my bike safe. Having a bike lock along to secure your investment is a good practice, though it can be cumbersome. With a cable or u-lock, how to store it if you don’t have a large enough saddlebag, or if it does fit how do you pack it so it won’t rattle around or snag an item of clothing, that is the question? Now with the simplicity of the Hiplok Spin, wear it as a visible belt, and as fast as you can click the lock, you are ready to leave the bike secure.

The neon yellow Hiplok Spin offers added visibility when riding.

 

The Hiplok Spin bike lock makes multiple stops convenient

Running into the store, near the trailhead, was fast, easy, and secure with the Hiplok Spin.

It’s a perfect bike lock when you are meeting a friend at a restaurant for lunch, picking up a book at a library or running in to use the restroom at a trailhead. A well-designed and thought-out wearable bike lock system it’s easy to adjust, making it hassle-free when putting it on or taking it off. With the added convenience of an integrated four-digit, resettable combination lock, there’s no need to carry a key. This wearable, lightweight bike lock, available in black or neon yellow for added visibility, adjusts easily to fit your waist (26″ to 44″) without being locked to your body.

When the Hiplok Spin may not be enough

When planning to leave my bike in a questionable high-traffic area, the Spin would not be my solo-choice. For more extended periods of storing my bike out in a public place, I prefer using a combination of a cable and D-lock. It provides a more secure solution to protect my bike from theft when I am away from it at a meeting or the theater. See Hiplok’s helpful bicycle security chart; it may help you find the right lock for your ride.

Ideally, you should always use the most secure lock your budget will allow with a secondary lock for wheels and accessories. However, in the real world, carrying extra items while biking, isn’t always practical. Each ride is different, and you need to balance security with practicality in choosing the right lock for securing your bike.

A bicycle headlight that works well on or off the bike

By Russ Lowthian, HaveFunBiking

No matter what time of the year there is never enough daylight and having a bicycle headlight is a necessary item for any cyclist riding on the road or on trails. Over the last couple of months, I have had the chance to test the Fenix BC21R v2.0 bicycle headlight in several applications with memorable success. Retailing at less than $75, the Fenix worked well while commuting by bike and fat biking through the snow. This 1,000-lumens capacity light offered me several beam output settings that I needed at dusk and in the dark to see and be seen. Plus its makes a handy stand-alone flashlight when not on my bike.

This light easily clips-out from the handlebar, in a minute’s notice, to become a handy flashlight.

 

 

The Fenix BC21R v2.0 bicycle headlight out of the box

The Fenix bicycle light comes packaged and inside the box, you’ll find:

The light fits well in the packaging with the extra parts tucked behind the form-fitting plastic holder.

  • BC21R v2 Light head
  • Fenix rechargeable Li-ion battery
  • USB Type C charging cable
  • A handlebar mount, with two extra rubber mounting shims
  • Spare O-ring
  • User manual
  • Warranty card

The light fits well in the packaging with the extra parts tucked inside. The Fenix branded 18650 Li-ion battery is pre-installed in the headlight with a small piece of insulation that needs to be removed before charging and using. The housing of the bicycle headlight is engineered to protect it from dust and foreign objects and is perfect for safe cycling on those rainy days.

Bike commuting with the Fenix bicycle light

As the days get shorter (up through December 22nd  with winter solstice) using the Fenix bicycle handlebar light gave me several beam options with the lights four settings. Plus, while commuting or running errands the light was easy to remove at stops, for security and/or to plug it in for an added charge.

Through the woods on a snow-covered trail

Fat biking over the snow-covered trail the beamwidth of the Fenix was more than adequate.

Recently fat biking through the snow-covered forest I found the beam width adequate, the majority of the time in the lights medium mode. But, when the trail became more technical, it was easy to bump it up to the Turbo Mode. At 1,000-lumens, with two-hours of run time, the output was near that of riding in daylight.

A recap of the Fenix BC21R v2.0 bicycle headlight

The Fenix bicycle light is an interesting alternative to most lights in its price range. The light comes with a chargeable battery that can be easily replaced. It offers a high-quality optic lens with four settings for beam spread to make your time in the dark and low-light periods enjoyable. And with the convenient bicycle mount the light easily clips-out, in a minute’s notice, to a handy, multi-mode flashlight. For more information on Fenix and to order a bicycle headlight go to their website here.

The Anoka 10-mile bike loop is full of fun and history while exploring

by Russ Lowthian, HaveFunBiking.com

At the confluence of the Rum and Mississippi Rivers, you can discover the city of Anoka offering fun options at every trail intersection along the route. A bike-friendly community to explore you will find parks and historic neighborhoods on the Anoka 10-mile bike loop.  One of the nine Twin Cities Gateway communities, it’s a perfect destination for a bike vacation with all the trail opportunities here. So, if you enjoy pedaling through charming neighborhoods that connect to some of the areas river trails on your next bike adventure.

The Anoka 10-mile bike loop is an adventure for all skill levels of riders.

The Anoka 10-mile bike loop

We recommend starting your bike ride at the Gathering Place Band Shell. It’s located in Akin Riverside Park, on the east bank of the Rum River, a block west of Ticknor Hill Bed & Breakfast.

Traveling clockwise, over the river bridge and the pedestrian crossing on Ferry Street enjoy riding along picturesque Benton Street in the historic Whiskey Flats neighborhood. Don’t be alarmed if you hit a pass-through trail while riding along this residential lane it deters traffic. The street here, a part of the Mississippi River Trail, has been altered to block drive-through auto traffic. Soon you are on the trail pedaling into Mississippi River Community Park.

It’s fun riding a part of the Mississippi River Trail while in Anoka.

Kings Island and park amenities

Signage along the trail as you enter Kings Island.

Arriving in the park you will find restroom facilities and 1.7 miles of paved trail on the grounds here. The community park sits on the east bank of the Mississippi River with a playground structure is in the form of a boat, reminding users of the park’s connection with the Mighty Mississippi. The King Island section of the park incorporates the natural beauty of a wooded flood plain with hiking trails and a mix of prairie flowers.

Up to River Bend Park

Leaving the Mississippi River Park the Anoka 10-mile loop utilizes the trail along its northern route up through Anoka’s industrial area. After crossing Highway 10, notice the Regency Inn Hotel to your left and those who want to ride the 6-mile route should turn east on Vista Way here. Back on the 10-mile loop pedaling north up to Bunker Lake Boulevard. Just before the Rum River, you will find River Bend Park a perfect place to stop and view the Rum River. Another option, after crossing the river bridge, is to take the trail up, over Bunker Lake Boulevard to the Rum River Library and the Anoka Nature Preserve.

The Anoka Nature Preserve is a 200-acre passive recreational area with low maintenance, hard-packed roads, perfect for off-road cycling and hiking. Along the riverbank, several paths lead to wildlife observation decks. Back at the Preserves trailhead, north of the library, you will find a playground and a restroom option.

Riding along the Rum River

Now heading south on the Rum River Trail, pedal along the east bank of the river and enjoy the natural setting and wildlife viewing. As you get closer to the inner city of Anoka the trail pops out, onto the bike lane on 4th Avenue and through the historic Cutterville and Wet Flats neighborhoods. Here the 6-mile loop emerges from the west and the trail is available again to resume your ride along the river.

The Anoka 10-mile bike loop is fun for all ages!

The historic downtown district of Anoka

As you approach four metal grain bins along the trail you are entering the north side of the historic downtown area of Anoka. Here you will find several delicious dining establishments and other points of interest. Also known as the Halloween Capital of the World, the city of Anoka becomes alive with festivities each fall. Now, before taking the river trail, under Main Street and back to the band Shell, check out the observation deck at the Rum River Dam.

Downtown, don’t forget to stop at Two Scoops for ice cream.

Back at the Gathering Place Band Shell or your hotel checkout a nearby eating establishment and Two Scoops Ice Cream while planning another bike adventure in the Twin Cities Gateway Area.

Printable map and Q (cue)-sheet)

For a printable bike map of Anoka click here

For a turn-by-turn, Q-sheet of Anoka click here

The Blaine 10-mile bike loop can add more memories to a sporting event

by Russ Lowthian, HaveFunBiking.com

With miles of connecting bike trails around the city of Blaine, sports fans and visitors alike will find many phenomenal sights while bicycling here. One of the nine communities of the Twin Cities Gateway this city is a perfect destination for a bike vacation tied to a sporting event. The city offers many trail opportunities surrounding the sports facilities here. So, whether you are an athlete looking for a fun way to get a pre-game workout. Or, a visiting sports fan looking for some added memories we have some ideas starting with the Blaine 10-mile bike loop.

The Blaine 10-mile bike loop can add more fun to your game visit.

The Blaine 10-mile bike loop

A perfect bicycle tour before or after a game this bike loop begins in the parking lot of the National Sports Center(NSC). The route heads south using the service road between NSC and Schwan Super Rink and passes through several parking lots south to 101st  Avenue. Traveling in a clockwise direction drive your bike south on Davenport to the stoplight at 99th Avenue and cross Highway 65. If you are staying at the Asteria Inn & Suites, on 93rd Ave, this is a great place to meet up with the 10-mile loop. it is a short 1/4-mile ride, north on Baltimore Street, from the hotel to 99th Avenue.

The Blaine 10-mile bike loo is fun for all ages.

Crossing the highway and enjoying the trails in Blaine

If you prefer staying off the streets after crossing the highway the trail that runs parallel on 99th Avenue, on the south side, for your added comfort.  On Clover Leaf Parkway take a right, and you are soon on a sequence of city trails up through several neighborhoods. For the next couple miles the route meanderers to the north. As you pedal along the trail you will pass several small neighborhood ponds where it is common to view wildlife.

Many roads here offer trails that parallel for added comfort.

At 113th Ave. the route relies on a combination of roads (with parallel trails). These quiet, low traffic city streets connect you to more neighborhood trails on the route up to Paul Parkway. The last stretch on this section takes riders through the Blaine Baseball Complex with several trail options circling the ball fields. One option, if you don’t mind adding more mileage to your ride is taking a left at the trail T to Bunker Hills Regional Park. On the 10-mile loop turn to the east on Paul Parkway where you will find a trail running parallel with the street.

A sweet tooth option at the 6-mile mark

It’s always fun when riding in the Twin Cities Gateway to stop for ice cream.

If you don’t mind adding a couple of extra miles, take a left on Ulysses Street for ice cream. It is approximately a mile, each way, that you will have to add to your total mileage, But the Big Dipper Creamery is worth the extra miles with 52 flavors to choose. For any bike service needs, while touring here, Pioneer Cycle is across Highway 65, north of Main Street.

Enjoying nature along the trail.

Continuing east on Paul Parkway the route crosses over Highway 65 and turns south on Aberdeen St, again with a trail running parallel on the west side. If you have worked up an appetite for breakfast, lunch or some pie,  Carol’s Restaurant is an option. Her homemade cooking is always a treat when I stop there!. Further south, the 10-mile loop jogs to the east and meanders past some more picturesque trail setting that takes you over a wooden bridge.

Returning back to the NSC or your hotel

After the round-a-bout at 113th, the route continues south on Club W. Parkway. For those staying at the Best Western Plus or  Fairfield Inn & Suites in Blaine, take a right on 108th Ave. The Hotel is south of Target, on the east side to Baltimore Street. If you missed the Big Dipper Creamery option, above you will find ice cream next door to the hotel. For bike touring visitors staying at Asteria Inn & Suites, on 93rd Avenue, continue south using the cue sheet link below.

The 10-mile Blaine loop continues south on Davenport, below 105th Avenue and into the National Sports Center parking lot. Back at the NSC or your hotel checkout a nearby eating establishment and plan another bike adventure in the Twin Cities Gateway Area.

Printable map and Q (cue)-sheet)

For a printable bike map of Blaine click here

For a turn-by-turn, Q-sheet of Blaine click here

The Coon Rapids 10-mile bike loop makes it easy to connect and discover

by Russ Lowthian, HaveFunBiking.com

Named for the turbulent Mississippi River waters at the confluence of Coon Creek, the city of Coon Rapids is a fun place to explore on a bicycle. One of the nine communities in the Twin Cities Gateway it’s a perfect destination for a bike vacation using the Coon Rapids 10-mile bike loop. Here you will find many trail connections to hundreds of miles of trails. Both the Coon Creek Trail and the Mississippi River Trail are two greenway systems here that allow you to safely pedal throughout the area, with many connections. So, if you enjoy biking along rivers and creeks we have some ideas for you starting with the Coon Rapids 10-mile loop.

The 10-mile bike loop is fun for all levels of riders.

The Coon Rapids 10-mile bike loop

Leaving from the outer parking lot of the Muddy Cow Restaurant, or a nearby hotel the route travels in a clockwise direction. Pulling out onto Springbrook Drive this tour safely crosses Coon Rapids Boulevard. Once across, we suggest using the paved trails that run parallel to the street due to heavy traffic. After crossing 85th Avenue, about two miles into the loop consider stopping at the Springbrook Nature Center.

Many roads here offer trails that parallel for added comfort and fun.

Now pedaling along the south side of 85th Avenue, at East River Road cross the street at the stoplight and use the sidewalk on the west side, up to 85th Lane. Here enjoy the quiet neighborhood streets that connect you to the Mississippi River Trail (MRT).  At 86th Avenue continue straight ahead on the MRT up between two residences and the real fun begins. As the trail drops into the forested vegetation along the bank of the Mississippi River its a whole new experience.

The visitors center here makes a great rest stop.

Following the trail along the river to the Coon Rapids Dam, you will pass several trail T’s in the park offering more loop options. One loop in the park circles Cenaiko Lake where you will find many people fishing for trout.

The Coon Rapids Dam and Visitors Center

At the visitor’s center at the Coon Rapids Dam, you will find more information on the area and the history of the dam. The dam is another popular fishing location and a crossing point for many cyclists riding trails throughout the Twin Cities Metro.

Riding across the Coon Rapids dam always offers a refreshing mist of cool air.

Turning north to Coon Creek

Riding up Egret Boulevard you can ride in the bike lane or use the parallel pedestrian path.

Now at the Dam, the 10-mile Loop leaves the MRT and heads north out of the park on Egret Boulevard. A bike-friendly road, you can ride the designated bike lane or use the pedestrian path paralleling the street. Continuing north after crossing Coon Rapids Boulevard, at Robinson Drive you will find the Coon Creek Trailhead. On the trail and after crossing the creek, at the trail T, the 10-mile loop takes a right. If you want to add a few for miles to your ride here is another option. To your left, the trail will take you up through the Erlandson Nature Center and further along connects to Bunker Hills Regional Park.

The smells, sounds, and views of nature as you pedal

Now pedaling south alongside Coon Creek, enjoy the smells, sounds, and views of nature. This stretch of the trail is a tranquil wilderness setting as you pedal along the stream through the forested canopy.  After crossing over a creek bridge one more time, pass under the railroad tracks for another option. Stop for a round of bumper boats, go-karts or miniature golf at Lilli Putt before heading east and completing the 10-mile Loop.

Enjoying the enjoy the smells, sounds, and views of nature along the trail.

For the last few miles of the route, the trail runs parallel along Coon Rapids Extension and Boulevard. Back at the parking lot, or your hotel, check out nearby eating establishments and plan another bike adventure in the Twin Cities Gateway Area.

Printable map and Q (cue)-sheet)

For a printable bike map of Anoka click here

For a turn-by-turn, Q-sheet of Anoka click here

The Fridley 10-mile bike loop lets visitors discover the MRT

by Russ Lowthian, HaveFunBiking.com

Named for an early settler along the east bank of the Mississippi River. Today the bike-friendly Fridley 10-mile bike loop lets visitors discover art, nature and beautiful flower gardens along the way. With many cycling paths connecting to the Mississippi River Trail (MRT) and the Rice Creek Trail is easy. One of the nine communities of the Twin Cities Gateway, the city of Fridley is located just north of Minneapolis, and a fun place to explore. So, if you enjoy biking along the trails that Red River oxen carts once used we have some options to take in while enjoying the Fridley 10-mile bike loop.

Fun on the Fridley 10-mile bike loop.

The Fridley 10-mile bike loop

Starting from the outer parking lot of the LivINN Hotel, the Fridley route heads out in a clockwise direction. After crossing the Central Avenue intersection, drive your bike by using the bike lane on 53rd Avenue for the next two miles. Now turning to the north on Main Street, once over Interstate 694 you will pass Woodsprings Hotel. For those who would like to begin the 10-mile bike loop from this point, continue north up to 61st Avenue. Here on your left, you are at the Fridley train station.

Passing through Edgewater Garden Park on the MRT.

Taking the tunnel under the RR tracks

On the east side of the Northstar-Line Fridley Station use the elevator. Taking your bike with you down to the lower level and walk through the tunnel to the west side of the train tracks. On the main level, on the west side, the Mississippi River Trail (MRT) is right outside the door and ready for you to venture north again. An option for another day, consider boarding the Northstar Train with your bike and ride it up the Anoka, Elk River or Big Lake, then pedal back to Fridley, on the MRT. See the multi-modal train-to-trail cue-sheet here.

Many roads in Fridley offer trails that parallel for added comfort.

More adventure awaits at the Locke Lake trail T

Flower gardens invite you into the Banfill-Locke Center for the Arts.

Back on the 10-mile bike loop, continue pedaling north on the MRT as the trail passes through Edgewater Garden Park. A little further on, before turning into Locke Lake Park at the trail T, you have a couple more options. If you don’t mind adding some additional miles out and back, continue on the MRT to the Banfill-Locke Center for the Arts. With rotating art exhibits, the art center is next to Manomin County Park. Another mile further you will find the Springbrook Nature Center. These three community highlights can add more memorable moments to any bike ride.

Manomin County Park is on the same grounds as the Banfill-Locke Center for the Arts.

Back on the 10-mile bike loop, the trail connects to the Rice Creek Trail in Locke Lake Park. Use caution as you ride your bike through this area. You will need to apply both your front and rear brakes (or walk your bike) as you descend down along Locke Lake on the trail. If you are riding with others allow extra space between each, as there are a few sharp turns passing under the RR tracks next to Rice Creek, as it flows into the lake. Finally, at the next T, the Rice Creek Trail runs through Fridley Community Park.

Now riding east along the Rice Creek Trail

After crossing University Avenue, at the stoplight, resume riding east on the Rice Creek Trail. In this section between University and Highway 65, the Rice Lake Trail offers an upper and lower trail segment. The 10-mile loop uses the upper trail, as it’s a bit shorter and takes you past restroom facilities in the park before reaching the tunnel under Highway 65. After the tunnel resume the route by taking left at the trail T to Central Ave. If you are staying at Budget Host Hotel, or desire to start the 10-mile loop from here, at this trail T take a right and head south a block to the hotel.

Turning south ice cream may soon be an option

The trail route now, heading south, runs parallel to Central Avenue. If you have a sweet tooth and desire delicious Ice cream treat, turn right on Moore Lake Road into Grandpa’s Ice Cream.

The flavors here are worth stopping for.

Continuing along Central Ave, as you reach Hillcrest Drive you have one more option to cool off. If it’s a hot day, half-mile further south is Moore Lake Park where you will find a beach for a refreshing swim. Otherwise, take a left on Hillcrest and the route jogs through several neighborhood streets down to Matterhorn Drive. After crossing over Interstate 694, once more, turn right on Skywood Lane and follow the freeway border wall around to the start.

Back at the parking lot or your Fridley hotel, check out the nearby eating establishments and plan another bike adventure in the Twin Cities Gateway Area.

Printable map and Q (cue)-sheet)

For a printable bike map of Fridley click here

For a turn-by-turn, Q-sheet of Fridley click here