Maintenance Tips

BIKE MECHANIC HINTS

Choosing A Seat that Fits

Let’s face it most of our time on a bike is spent sitting down. That is why special attention should be paid to the seat when purchasing a bicycle. A good, comfortable saddle can be the difference between an exhilarating and a painful ride. When choosing a bike seat, there are elements to consider in order to guarantee a proper fit. Read on to learn how to choose a bike seat.

Step 1:
Select a seat type for your riding style. Fitness riders should consider a lightweight race seat. Mountain bike seats are recommended for off-road and terrain cyclists because of their slender shape. Gel seats are great for anyone who wants a more comfortable ride. Suspension seats are recommended for traveling on difficult terrain.

Step 2:
Consider gender when selecting your bicycle seat. A male’s seat will be long and narrow, while the females will be shorter and broader.

Step 3:
Get on the bicycle to adjust the seat height. Move the pedal to the six o’clock position with the ball of your foot. If your knee bends comfortably the seat is at the correct height. If your hips move sideways while pedaling, your seat should be lowered.

Step 4:
Take a seat. When you get off, you should leave two recesses in the center of the seat’s main part. If the marks are off-center the seat is not a good fit for your body.

Step 5:
Buy a bicycle seat cover for an added level of comfort. The drawstring provides for a tight fit over the existing seat. Covers are available in a variety of thicknesses and materials.

Step 6:
Downsize for children. When choosing a bike seat for a child make sure they can touch the pedals with their toes when in the six o’clock position.

Tips & Warnings

  • Low seats will cause knee strain, while high seats make pedaling and placing your foot on the ground difficult.
  • Narrow, racing-style seats are recommended for those who ride for speed.
  • Wide cushion seats work well for riders with handlebars level or slightly above the saddle.
  • Most seat posts have indicators to tell how high up the seat can go. If that height isn’t sufficient you will need a longer seat post.
  • Search the Internet for photos and additional information on seat types.

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