Tag Archives: #mtb

Last year at this time, we caught this biker dude out on the trail with his road bike. With skinny tires and a frame that did a lot of flexing he did pretty good testing his skills in Lebanon Hills Park, in Eagan, MN

Bike Pic May 08, who says you need a special bike for off-road fun?

Last year at this time, we caught this biker dude out on the trail with his road bike. With skinny tires and a frame that did a lot of flexing he did pretty good testing his skills in Lebanon Hills Park, in Eagan, MN.

View the new  National Bike Guide and all the fun rides coming up in 2018.

Thanks for viewing today’s ‘Spring Fun’ Bike Pic

Now rolling into our 11th year as a bike tourism media, our goal is to continue to encourage more people to bike and have fun. While highlighting all the unforgettable places for you to ride. As we continue to showcase more destinations you can have fun at we hope the photos we shoot are worth a grin. As you scroll through the information and stories we have posted, enjoy!

Do you have a fun bicycle related photo of yourself or someone you may know that we should post? If so, please send your picture(s) to: [email protected]. Include a brief caption (for each), of who is in the photo (if you know?) and where the picture was taken. Photo(s) should be a minimum of 1,000 pixels wide or larger, to be considered. If we do use your photo, you will receive photo credit and acknowledgment on Facebook and Instagram.

As we continues to encourage more people to bike, please view our Destination section at HaveFunBiking.com for your next bike adventure – Also, check out the latest  Bike Guide, mobile friendly as we enter into our 9th year of producing print and digital guides.

So bookmark HaveFunBiking.com and find your next adventure. Please share all our pic’s with your friends and don’t forget to smile. We may be around the next corner with a HFB camera ready to document your next move while you are riding and having fun. Capturing you in one of our next ‘Pic of the Day’ posts.

Have a great day and a memorable new year!

Fond spring bike pic memories on #10 of 30 Day of Biking in April. In this photo, here is what the trail should look like here in the upper Midwest. In this pic we caught this biker dude enjoying some time testing his riding skills in Lebanon Hills Park in Eagan, MN.

Bike Pic April 10, what the landscape should look like this time of the year

Fond spring bike pic memories on #10 of 30 Day of Biking in April. In this photo, here is what the trail should look like here in the upper Midwest. We caught this biker dude enjoying some time testing his riding skills in Lebanon Hills Park, in Eagan, last year at this time.

View the new  National Bike Guide and all the fun rides coming up in 2018.

Thanks for viewing today’s ‘Bike Pic

Now rolling into our 11th year as a bike tourism media, our goal is to continue to encourage more people to bike and have fun. While highlighting all the unforgettable places for you to ride. As we continue to showcase more destinations you can have fun at we hope the photos we shoot are worth a grin. As you scroll through the information and stories we have posted, enjoy!

Do you have a fun bicycle related photo of yourself or someone you may know that we should post? If so, please send your picture(s) to: [email protected]. Include a brief caption (for each), of who is in the photo (if you know?) and where the picture was taken. Photo(s) should be a minimum of 1,000 pixels wide or larger, to be considered. If we do use your photo, you will receive photo credit and acknowledgment on Facebook and Instagram.

As we continues to encourage more people to bike, please view our Destination section at HaveFunBiking.com for your next bike adventure – Also, check out the latest  Bike Guide, mobile friendly as we enter into our 9th year of producing print and digital guides.

So bookmark HaveFunBiking.com and find your next adventure. Please share all our pic’s with your friends and don’t forget to smile. We may be around the next corner with a HFB camera ready to document your next move while you are riding and having fun. Capturing you in one of our next ‘Pic of the Day’ posts.

Have a great day and a memorable new year!

Fond early summer memories riding the mountain bike trail. Here in today pic we caught this father/son duo enjoying some time together while testing their riding skills in Lebanon Hills Park

Bike Pic April 3, fond summer memories stirs plans for 2018 riding

Fond early summer memories riding the mountain bike trail. Here in today pic we caught this father/son duo enjoying some time together while testing their riding skills in Lebanon Hills Park in Eagan, MN.

View the new  National Bike Guide and all the fun rides coming up in 2018.

Thanks for viewing today’s ‘fond summer memories’ Pic of the Day

Now rolling into our 11th year as a bike tourism media, our goal is to continue to encourage more people to bike and have fun. While highlighting all the unforgettable places for you to ride. As we continue to showcase more destinations you can have fun at we hope the photos we shoot are worth a grin. As you scroll through the information and stories we have posted, enjoy!

Do you have a fun bicycle related photo of yourself or someone you may know that we should post? If so, please send your picture(s) to: [email protected]. Include a brief caption (for each), of who is in the photo (if you know?) and where the picture was taken. Photo(s) should be a minimum of 1,000 pixels wide or larger, to be considered. If we do use your photo, you will receive photo credit and acknowledgment on Facebook and Instagram.

As we continues to encourage more people to bike, please view our Destination section at HaveFunBiking.com for your next bike adventure – Also, check out the latest  Bike Guide, mobile friendly as we enter into our 9th year of producing print and digital guides.

So bookmark HaveFunBiking.com and find your next adventure. Please share all our pic’s with your friends and don’t forget to smile. We may be around the next corner with a HFB camera ready to document your next move while you are riding and having fun. Capturing you in one of our next ‘Pic of the Day’ posts.

Have a great day and a memorable new year!

Starting a new sport like Mountain Biking is a ton of fun. The experience of exploring local trails and challenging obstacles is exhilarating. Here are a few tips.

Get into Mountain Biking with these few tips!

John Brown, HaveFunBiking

Starting a new sport like Mountain Biking is a ton of fun. The experience of exploring local trails and challenging obstacles is exhilarating. Here are a few tips to get you riding faster and smoother.

Mountain Biking Tip 1 – Hips Don’t Lie

Want to make your bike turn? Simple, just turn the handlebars, right?!  Well….not exactly. Contrary to popular belief you don’t really steer with the handlebars when mountain biking as much as you think. Your bike turns when you shift your center of gravity (hips). If you want proof, try this basic test next time you’re on your bike. Ride along a piece of smooth flat ground and push gently on your right grip. Pushing on the right grip will turn the front wheel to the left, and theoretically, the bike will turn left. What will actually happen is that your bike will jerk to the right. How can this be? Well, when you push on the right grip, your center of gravity shifts to the right, and your bike follows. So next time you ride, try and keep your hips centered over the bike for stability, and when turning, shift them in the direction you want to go.

This rider has shifted his weight into the turn

This riders hips are pointed in the direction of the turn

Mountain Biking Tip 2 – Knees In

Mountain biking successfully is all about traction. As the trail changes material, density, and direction, you are in the constant pursuit of traction. Losing traction in a turn is dangerous but mostly avoidable. To maximize the traction you do have, First, turn your hips into the turn like stated above, then also lower your outside foot and turn both knees into the turn. By doing this, you are lowering your center of gravity (giving you more stability) and adding force to the area of your tire that is doing the gripping. Testing this one is easy and FUN! Pick a corner you can comfortably take with some speed ride through it with you feet level and hips on the pushed to the outside of the turn. Then take the same turn with your outside foot down, and hips and knees pointed to the inside of the turn (on your outside leg, the inner surface of your hip may rest on the top tube. That’s OK). you should feel the difference in traction immediately.

Mountain Biking Tip 3 – Be Shocking

MTB body shock

Most mountain bikes are equipped with suspension to absorb impact and maintain stability. That suspension can handle rocks, logs or bumps smaller than your fist. While suspension does a great job of taking the edge off, most trails consist of larger objects. Your legs and arms can be your suspension once things get rougher. Keep a good bend to your elbows and knees, get off your saddle, and be the shock. You will find that with some motion on your part, your bike can start handling objects taller than a water bottle with ease.

Go Straight Really Fast, and if Something Gets in Your Way……….Turn

Sounds simple, but it’s the truth. Speed naturally helps with stability. As wheels get up to speed, they naturally want to stay upright. You will also find that the faster you go the trail will feel smother. This is from the bikes tires skipping over the tops of objects, rather than dipping into every valley between them.  Once at speed, try to keep your bars facing the direction you want to go and your hips centered. If the front wheel is always facing the direction of movement, its’s easier to maintain speed and stability. Speed does have its consequences as well. Always ride within your abilities.

mountain biking at speed

With more speed, tires begin skipping over the high points of the trail

Ride Within Your Ability, but Experiment

When you go mountain biking with others, there can be pressure to ride everything others ride. If a trail is filled with obstacles above your skill level, walk it. You may also want to attempt the first part only. Once you master that first obstacle, try the second, and so on. Breaking challenging trail sections into smaller parts, mastering each separately, then trying to connect everything is a great way to build confidence and stay safe.

By using these tips you should feel comfortable in time, exploring all the trails you area has to offer. Remember to start small and progress as you feel comfortable and follow the rules of the trail. If you liked this information, check out our riding hacks for road bikes as well.

Mountain Bikes (MTB) may all look similar, however there are substantial differences between them. First lets take a look at the "It looks like a mountain bike" version, then we will look at a true mountain bike.

Mountain Bikes: What is best for you and the terrain you will ride

by John Brown, HaveFunBiking.com

Mountain Bikes (MTB) may all look similar, however if you are planning on purchasing a new one there are some substantial differences between them. First lets take a look at the “It looks like a mountain bike” version, then we will look at a true mountain bike.

Trail/Path bicycles that look like mountain bikes

There are some Trail/Path cycles that will look like Mountain Bikes, but aren’t designed for off road use. These Trail/Path bikes are popular because riders like the stability, traction, control, and upright riding position of a Mountain Bike but don’t need the features geared toward off road use.

Mountain Bikes in name

Trail/Path “Mountain Bikes” have higher bars, narrower tires, and less suspension travel.

Mountain Bikes True to Their Name

A true Mountain Bike is designed to be ridden off road over loose and rocky terrain. These actual all terrain bicycles offer suspension designed for control rather than comfort, are equipped with low gearing designed to navigate steep, loose terrain, and are built using more durable components to hold up to the constant impacts of riding off road.

Mountain bikes Yeti

True Mountain Bikes have more suspension, and larger tires.

Mountain Bike Suspension

A key feature of a true mountain bike is the suspension that allows the wheels to move up and down over objects giving the rider better traction and more control. The amount the wheel can move is called travel. Therefore, a suspension fork that has 100mm of travel can move up and down 100mm (roughly 4″).

Mountain Bikes Suspension

What Kind of Mountain Bikes are Available?

Mountain bikes get grouped by their intended riding conditions. As an example, Cross country bikes (XC) are designed to move quickly both uphill and downhill. For example, XC bikes are light and the suspension is most often limited to 100mm of travel.

Trail bikes are like cross country bikes, but rather than being concerned with maximum speed uphill, they focus a bit more on the downhill. Trail bikes have suspension ranges between 100mm and 140mm of travel.

Mountain Bikes Trail

All-mountain (or Enduro) bicycles take the idea of a trail bike a step further. Therefore, they offer more travel and are focused on offering the most amount of control and speed while descending, while still being capable of riding back to the top of the hill.

Within each of those categories hardtails (front suspension only) and full suspension (front and rear suspension) are available as well as electric assist versions (using a battery and powered motor)

What is the Deal with wheel size       

                     

Unlike road or city/path bikes, Mountain bikes come in many different wheel sizes. The first mountain bikes were built in Marin County California 40 years ago. Notably, the only tires available were old 26″ balloon tires from the 1950’s which is why 26″ wheels were used. As technology progressed, the benefits of larger and wider tires became apparent. Initially, 26” tires were made wider for more traction (up to 3” wide). Then a few small builders tried the idea of a larger diameter wheel (29”). The benefits of a larger wheels are that objects are smaller in relation the them, offering a smoother ride, and the amount of rubber on the path is greater (better traction). Now there are a half dozen wheel sizes available, that all have their own benefits and drawbacks.

What type of Mountain Bike is best for me?

To start, think about what you want out of your ride. Someone who wants to burn through a loop of their local park as fast as possible, or likes to push themselves on the climbs as much as they do the descent would probably be a good candidate for a cross country bicycle. It’s light weight frame and efficiency will help that rider get more enjoyment/speed out of their ride.

Another rider might like to make good time on the climbs, but push a bit more on the downhill. They ride quickly (trying to beat their friends maybe) but aren’t looking to enter a competitive race. In this case a trail bike helps this rider have more fun.

Finally, another rider might totally live for speeding downhill. Getting back to the top of the hill is only an inconvenience for this person. therefore, they are willing to push a heavier bike up the hill if that weight equates into more traction and more control at high speeds. This rider would love the benefits an all mountain (or Enduro) bike gives them.

Are there any other kinds of Mountain Bikes?

Yes. There are Fatbikes, Downhill bikes, Trials bikes, dirt jumping bikes……The list goes on and on. To delve into all the subdivisions of bicycles, head into your local bike shop. Seeing and test riding the nuances of different bicycles will give you a quick education.

Be the coolest biker on your block when you learn how to wheelie

by John Brown, HaveFunBiking.com

Very few bicycle moves are as cool as the wheelie. When I was younger only a few of my friends could Wheelie and as I got older that number decreased. Beyond the “cool factor” wheelies can also help you get up and over objects on the trail with a bunny hop. Ultimately, the ability to control the bicycles balance side to side as well as front to back, while riding on one wheel, will make you a better rider all around. Here is the low down on teaching yourself how to do a wheelie. Please wear helmet!

Find the right place

The right practice location is key at first, but becomes unnecessary once you begin to get accustomed to the wheelie. To start, I find somewhere that is very slightly uphill, easily ride-able, but also soft is ideal. The types of places that come to mind are golf courses, turf fields, dirt trails, and bike paths. The gradual uphill gives you a little effort to help get the front wheel up, and the soft surface makes it nicer if you accidentally dismount.

If life were a mountain bike trail and Wheelie Wednesday helped smooth out your day-to-day ride or aided you in dropping into your sweet spot,

The steps

Starting out- Start in a medium gear on a slight incline. Begin pedaling normally and until you are moving at a walking pace. Then lower your upper body slightly, bend your elbows, and put your dominant leg into the 11 o’clock position.

Getting it up- Here is the moment of truth. Pedal forward forcefully while pulling up on the bars. Once the front wheel begins to lift, move your upper body back (locking out your arms) and attempt to have the front wheel stay up.

Keeping it up- When the front wheel is up, there are a few directions you need to handle all at once. You need to pedal in an effort to keep the front wheel up, feather the rear brake in order to stop your weight from moving too far back, as well as try to maintain your position left and right.

Balance- To keep balance front to back, continually feather the rear brake as you pedal. If you are balancing properly, pedaling will start to move your weight too far back, so you will be tapping your rear brake on nearly each pedal stroke too move your weight back forward.

how to wheelie

get your front wheel up by pedaling and moving your weight back. Then use the rear brake and pedaling forces to control your position.

To control the side to side movement, use a combination of your knees and handlebars. As an example, if you feel the bike drifting off to the right, turn the bars to the left while also sticking your left knee out. Keep in mind, it is very important to try and control balance issues early, as the bike gets farther and farther toward any direction, it becomes increasingly more difficult to correct.

How to Wheelie

King of Wheelies, Perry Kramer showing how to hang a knee out.

Practice

I would love to say that reading the steps above will have you rockin’ wheelies in no time, bit the truth is it takes a lot of practice. Picture this: All at the same time you will be pedaling, braking, leaning, turning, and balancing in precise amounts. Getting proficient is not going to happen overnight.

Success

You will find that the new talent of Wheeling leads into new challenges, as well as better control. Additionally, as you become good at wheelies, you will find it Is easier to get up and over obstacles. Whatever the outcome, you will be satisfied in yourself that you have practiced, and achieved a new skill.

Mountain bike hacks: fat bike tips and tricks for winter fun!

by  John Brown. HaveFunBiking.com

For many of us, riding offroad through the winter is impossible without a fat bike. Our trails get covered with snow in December and don’t see the light of day again until April. While riding a fat bike is a great substitution for riding a mountain bike, it does behave differently than a standard mountain bike. Here are a few quick and easy hacks to riding fat bikes that will get you enjoying the snow in no time.

Why a fat bike

What makes a fat bike special is its ability to ride though deep snow with ease. The reason it is at home in snow is that these tires are between 4” to 5” wide. That width offers traction and flotation on the softest of terrains like snow and sandy ground cover.

Tire pressure

With wider tires comes a larger overall air volume, meaning that fat bikes have more space for air in their tires than a standard mountain bike. Due to that increased volume, fat bikes use a very different air pressure than your standard mountain bike tire. As an example, in very deep snow it’s not unheard of to run the tires as low as 8 psi. By contrast, a standard mountain bike tire at 8 psi would be completely un-rideable. Proper air pressure for a fat bike tire can be difficult to achieve if you don’t know what you are looking for. Basically, you want the tire to be able to deform easily over terrain, but not be so low that the tire “squirms” or collapses under hard turning efforts. I find it easy to get here by filling the tires until they are slightly less than firm, then lowering the air pressure incrementally over the first few minutes of a ride until the tires really perform well. You will know you let too much air out if the bike bobs up and down with each pedal stroke.

Turning

Due to the soft nature of snow, turning can be tricky. While turning on a normal mountain bike you move your body weight forward rely on the tires traction, then aggressively force the bike through the turn. Considering snow is soft and will not support that type of maneuver turning requires a slightly more finessed approach. First, leave your weight in a neutral position centered over the bicycle. Next, shift your weight toward the inside of the turn and begin turning the bars slightly toward the turn. The front wheel is more of a tiller than anything else.  Use it to direct the angle and direction of the bike, but resist the urge to load it up with weight. As the bike angles toward the turn, focus your weight on the rear wheel. If done properly, you will feel as if the bike is turning from the rear wheel rather than the front and your front tire won’t wash out.

fatbike

Weight back and rear wheel doing most the work.

Climbing with a fat tire bike

Climbing with limited traction can be difficult as well. Rather than putting your bike in its lowest gear and muscling up the hill you need to be wary of not letting the rear tire slip. If you drop the bike into its lowest gear, chances are the rear tire will have too much torque. Too much torque will cause your tire to rip through the snow and slip. The best thing to do is move your weight backward and pedal with as even a pressure and cadence as possible. Standing and pedaling, or jabbing on the pedals will most likely cause the rear wheel to break free.

Ice and studs on a fat tire bike

On snow covered trails that get ridden often it is possible for the trails to get packed in and begin to freeze solid. Once ice is on the trail it becomes very difficult to control the bike with standard rubber tires. For this reason, I recommend adding studs to your tires if your trail riding is susceptible to ice.

studded tire

MTB studded tire from Schwalbe (left) and stud detail of 45nrth tire (right)

Overall fun

The biggest tip I can give to fat biking is to keep it fun! Riding a fat bike is a totally different experience than riding a normal Mountain bike, and requires its own skills. Try not to get frustrated because it handles differently than your other off road bikes, just focus on building some new skills. Also, with riding in colder temperatures, enjoy the time you have. While a 4 hour mountain bike ride in the summer is great, you may not be able to stay warm that long through the winter. Beyond the different skills and time, enjoy the unique rewards only Fatbiking can give you.

Towards the southern edge of the Bloomington river bottoms trail there's a bridge that takes you across the Minnesota River. Right before the Bloomington Ferry Bridge you'll see a rocky slope that travels down into the woods. This slope is the start of a great adventure.

First impressions: Bloomington River Bottoms Trail

By Andrew Ellis

Towards the southern edge of the Bloomington river bottoms trail there’s a bridge that takes you across the Minnesota River. Right before the Bloomington Ferry Bridge you’ll see a rocky slope that travels down into the woods. This slope is the start of a great adventure. It’s known as the Minnesota River Bottoms Trail. Now, you may worry that you can only ride with a mountain bike on the singletrack trail, but you are safe on a regular trail/path bike also. You just have to watch where you’re riding.

The Bloomington River Bottoms Trail

The ride itself is fun and challenging. The trail is made out of dirt. While it may be smooth riding for the most part it’s not immune to the unpredictability of Mother Nature. Pedaling along you may come across places that are soft and muddy from a recent rainfall. Not only that, but this trail is used pretty regularly so you’ll see other tire tracks that have gone through and made the puddles deeper and muddier in the aftermath. Usually you can ride through or ride around it. If you ride through, you may feel your tires slip but as long as you keep going you should be fine. Riding around the puddle will take a little more concentration. You may either be able to find a dry area around its perimeter where your tires can fit or an area that hasn’t been touched.

It’s Friday and time to ride off on another weekend of fun taking in that next bike adventure that maybe includes testing out a fat bike ride.

The Minnesota River Bottoms is not only a great place to ride Fatbikes, but the birthplace of them.

For most of the ride you’ll be along the river with a few trails leading you away. You’ll come upon many obstacles as well, such as logs set up for you to ride over if you wish and different turns that will keep you alert. Small trails will split off the main path and take you to other scenic areas, but usually connect back to the main trail eventually. While the trail is mostly flat, the sandy conditions can make it hard to pedal. Also, the trail often changes shape after the river floods which makes for unique rides!

Here is a fallen branch that acts as a bridge in the MN river bottoms.

Here is a fallen branch that acts as a bridge crossing the Bloomington’s river bottoms.

You’ll find a few opportunities to cross the tributary streams that feed the river. One is a wood bridge that’s also partly on a fallen tree branch. You can certainly try riding across and risk falling in, or you can carry your bike across. There’s also a floating dock that allows room for you and your bike. You’ll use the rope to pull yourself across the river so you can continue your ride.

Enjoy an upper body stretch pulling you and your bike across river.

Why the trail is fun!

It takes a little more concentration than paved trails, but the uncertainty of what you’ll encounter is all part of the fun. On a paved trail you can have plenty of fun with the different twists, turns, climbs, and descends. You’ll even have plenty of views to stop and look at. But this track is different. While it is maintained, the trail gives you the feeling of being unprotected. It’s just you and the elements. There will be plenty of debris on the trail, and more than a few low branches that you’ll either have to dodge or be okay with them hitting you in the face.

Winter fat bike fun is back in the upper Midwest as this biker takes a break for this photo opp.

And winter biking is always fun on the Bloomington River Bottoms Trail.

Find out more about Bloomington’s biking opportunities here.

No matter your level of bicycle riding skills, bike lights are essential to make sure you have a safe ride, day or night. Bike lights aren't only needed when the sun goes down.

With more darkness then daylight the zen and the art of night biking

by John Brown, HaveFunBiking.com

Seasons change and eventually we are left with more darkness than daylight, thus night biking. day. This annual march to the darkest day of the year was the inspiration Robert Frost needed to write Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening.  On occasion my “Little Horse” asks if “there is some mistake”, but of course Frost was talking about the animal and I the machine. The draw of the dark and cold is the same though, snow muffles sound and darkness can be beautiful. If you haven’t tried night mountain biking, I encourage it!

mountain biking at night

Snow, dark, and silence make mountain biking at night great.

Night biking, who turned off the lights?

You will need a good light to mountain bike at night. I recommend to start with something around 1000 lumens, but more if you can get it. Be aware of the beam pattern when you buy a light because while a wide and dim beam would be great to alert passing motorists of your presence. When mountain biking, you need all the light in front of you, so for that reason try to find a light with a rather narrow beam. Another consideration when buying a light is if it can be mounted on your helmet. Many riders prefer to sync their light with their sight line, so they can look around corners and up the trail if needed, while pointing the bike where it needs to go. By contrast, bar mounted lights only point toward where you are going at that moment.

Buddy system is best for night biking

Night riding is not a time to go it alone. It’s not as if the actual riding is any more dangerous or difficult, but if there is an issue, you are far less likely to run into a helpful passerby at night. Therefore, bring your helpful passerby along with you. The only issue I have had riding with others at night is the shadows that more than one light will produce. This issues is easily remedied by spreading out a bit further than you would in the daytime.

Night Riding in groups is fun and safe.

What to expect when night biking

The greatest part of night riding is it’s ability to surprise you. As an example, I find that trails I know by heart take on new dimensions when my light is focused but limited. This change of visual often directs me to take new lines and approach areas differently. Also, you see totally different wildlife in the woods at night. Coyote, owl, and bats are some of my more favorite night time friends. Finally, mountain biking at night gives you the feeling that you are going faster. I don’t exactly know the psychological reasons, but when you can only see 20-30 feet in front of you, those feet seem to accelerate faster than if your vision was unlimited.

Quiet

Riding a mountain bike at night is also a chance to enjoy the quiet. Fewer riders and less commotion helps me eliminate one more distraction and just enjoy the trail. Add in snow to muffle any sound that is there, and you have the recipe for a Zen like mountain biking experience.

mountain biking at night

Surroundings melt away leaving only the trail ahead.

“But I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep”

We all have a life outside of our bike, and far too little time to live it. Riding your mountain bike at night is a way to find hours you might not normally have to ride. After the kids are asleep, the dishes are done, lunches are packed and laundry folded, consider mountain biking an alternative to turning in for the night. You might just love what you find!

 

Now that I have had over a month of cold weather under my belt, I feel comfortable talking about the Sealskinz Winter Halo Glove.

A mid term review of this amazing Sealskinz Halo Winter Glove

by John Brown, HaveFunBiking

Now that I have had over a month of cold weather under my belt, I feel comfortable talking about the Sealskinz Halo Winter Glove. The onset of Minnesota’s winter is probably colder than most peoples harsh winter months, so I feel that this mid term review is probably a great indicator for 90 percent of America’s  riding needs.

The pros of the Sealskinz winter glove so far

i think we all agree, the major selling feature for any winter glove is warmth and this glove has that in spades. I have ridden well into the mid-teens and never once wanted for more insulation. Considering these gloves are a full five finger glove and lightweight, the fact that they are warm is unparalleled. Overall the gloves breath well, fit well and have a great amount of flexibility. I like the large Velcro flap that acts as the wrist closure and the palm material’s tacky grip on the bar.

The cons to date

The lighting system is one of the selling features for these gloves, but sadly it didn’t preform as stated. While the lights are bright their position on the glove doesn’t lend to amazing visibility. However, they do offer a really cool look when signaling your turns. Sadly, for me, one of the blinkers didn’t start well and didn’t last long. The bracket that holds the battery was loose from the factory and led to intermittent function. I was able to readjust the bracket (read bent) and the light functioned well. Unfortunately, maybe due to my work the wires broke free from the switch.

sealskinz

The wiring broke free on my Halo light (red circle). Luckily the part is replaceable

More Sealskinz  info coming

With the lighting system aside, these gloves have been amazing. Considering that the Sealskinz Glove is known for warmth and not electronics, this makes sense. I’m planning on riding these gloves right up until they can’t insulate anymore. So far they have done a better job than any of the dozen or so gloves I have sitting at home. I also hope to see how long the palm material stays grippy. That palm is starting to show some signs of wear, but overall, they are well intact.

sealskinz

Light wear on the Halo’s palm